skin classic

  • How to get rid of sebaceous hyperplasia?

    Sunday, March 17, 2019 - 7:42pm

    Sebaceous hyperplasia is a common, benign condition of sebaceous glands in adults of middle age or older. It’s a harmless skin disorder of the sebaceous (oil) glands, where the sebaceous gland becomes enlarged. These harmless bumps often appear soft, yellowish in colour with a cauliflower-like or donut-shaped appearance ranging in size from 2 to 3mm. They usually appear on the forehead and cheeks in fair-skinned people who have dealt with oily or combination skin over the years.

  • April is National Rosacea Awareness Month

    Tuesday, April 3, 2018 - 5:55am

    The National Rosacea Society has deemed April as Rosacea Awareness Month, by the National Rosacea Society (NRS). Rosacea is a very common disease that affects 15% to 25% of all people. Diffused redness (early rosacea) refers to a condition caused by dilated capillaries, most commonly affecting the nose, forehead, and cheeks.

  • What are Sebaceous Hyperplasias?

    Monday, December 4, 2017 - 11:24pm

    Sebaceous hyperplasia is the term used for enlarged sebaceous glands seen on the forehead or cheeks of the middle-aged and elderly leading to an ongoing problem with over-productive oil glands. They appear to be somewhat indented in the middle. This indented centre is characteristic of sebaceous hyperplasia. It has nothing to do with milia or an old spot.

  • INTRODUCING the Skin Classic

    Thursday, August 21, 2014 - 8:13am

    Introducing the Skin Classic Treatment of Skin Growths.    

    NOW, A SAFE, NON-INVASIVE TREATMENT THAT TARGETS UNSIGHTLY SKIN GROWTHS FROM YOUR FACE AND BODY IN JUST ONE SESSION.

    Treatment of Skin Growths is now Fast, Easy and Affordable.  

    • Age Spots
    • Sun Spots Treatment
    • Skin Tags Treatment
    • Cherry Angiomas
    • Fibromas Keratosis
    • Cholesterol Deposits
    • Calcium Bumps

     

    WHAT ARE SKIN GROWTHS?

  • February Edition of Ask the Experts

    Thursday, March 13, 2014 - 12:00pm

    What are Milia and what causes them?